Fire Prevention and Fire Fighting

Aims

This model course aims to provide the training for candidates in fire prevention and fighting in accordance with Section A-VI/1 of the STCW Code.

Objective

This syllabus covers the requirements of the 1995 STCW Convention Chapter VI, Section AVI/1, paragraph 2 and Table A-VI/1-2. On meeting the minimum standard of competence in fire prevention and firefighting, a trainee will be competent to take appropriate measures for the safety of personnel and of the ship and to use fire appliances correctly. The trainee will also have a knowledge of fire prevention.

Entry Standards

The course is open to all seafarers and prospective seafarers and should be completed prior to employment on a sea-going ship. All trainees must be certified by a doctor to be in good health.

Course intake limitations

The maximum number of trainees attending each session will depend on the availability of instructors, equipment and facilities available for conducting the training. Any practical training should be undertaken in small groups of not more than six trainees per instructor.

Staff requirements

All the instructors have appropriate training in instructional techniques and training methods (STCW Code A-1/6, pa.7.). In addition, all training and instruction are given by qualified personal; the senior instructor, having considerable experience in fire safety and fire-fighting techniques, should have a good knowledge of ships, including stability considerations. All assistant instructors are has practical knowledge of firefighting and familiar with ships. During any practical training one instructor must be in charge of each group.

Training facilities and equipment

A/C classroom facilities and an overhead projector are sufficient for the theoretical part of the course. When making use of audiovisual materiel such as videos or slides, we make sure appropriate equipment is available. In addition, a demonstration table measuring 3 m by 1 m would be advantageous. Separate rooms, equipped with a table and chairs, will also be needed to accommodate three or four groups of trainees during case studies and other group assignments.

For the practical part of the course it would be advantageous if the training facilities of a local or port fire brigade could be used. Alternative, the following structure and equipment are required:

  • Constructed fire mock with three steel containers for fire drills (see Figure A)
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  •  Room with work bench area for inspection and maintenance of breathing apparatus
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  •  2 steel fire trays
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  •  2 three-sided brick fire trays
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  •  2 fire hydrants with 2 outlets each, or a similar water supply from open water andFire pump
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  •  A large supply of carbonaceous and hydrocarbon fuels (wood, diesel, and lubricating oils,etc.) for the fire trays
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  •  2 dummies, for search and rescue procedures
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  •  2 hoses (60 mm diameter)
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  •  6 fire nozzles (2 standard, 2 diffuser and 2 jet spray)
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  •  2 stand pipes, with keys and bars to operate the hydrant supply
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  •  2 water extinguishers (9 litre)
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  •  2 foam extinguishers (9 litre)
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  •  2 carbon dioxide extinguishers (5 kilogram)
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  •  2 dry powder extinguishers
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  •  Protective clothing, overalls, gloves, fire-boots, helmets and rainproof clothing
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  •  2 sets of self-contained breathing apparatus, complete with spare cylinders, spare parts and maintenance tools (including sets for use by instructors only)
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  •  distress signal
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  •  Smoke generator
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  •  Smoke helmets with air pump
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  •  A shower at the site
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  •  1 Stretcher
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  •  1 first-aid kit
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  •  1 resuscitation kit with oxygen/suction unit
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  •  2 sets of fire-protective clothing
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  •  2 helmets with visor and neck protector
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  •  2 fire axes
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  •  2 safety lines (36 meters long) with snapshots
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  •  Indication of escape routes in the mock-up
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Course Outline and Timetable


Lectures

Lectures are presented within a familiar context and make use of practical examples. They well illustrated with diagrams, photographs and charts where appropriate, and related to matter learned during seagoing time.

An effective manner of presentation and giving information and then reinforcing it. For example, first tell the trainees briefly what we are going to present to them; then cover the topic in detail; and, finally, summarize what we have told them. The use of an overhead projector and the distribution of copies of the transparencies as trainees handouts contribute to the learning process.

Course Outline 

The tables that follow list the competencies and areas of knowledge, understanding and proficiency, together with the estimated total hours required for lectures and practical exercises. Teaching staff well aware that timings are suggestions only and should be adapted to suit individual groups of trainees depending on their experience, ability, equipment and staff available for training.

Previous experience from colleges and academies conducting training in firefighting shows that as much time as possible can be spent on practical exercises. This fact is also supported by the feedback from course participants. In planning and scheduling training, teaching staff have been instructed to devote them maximum time possible to practical training.

Teaching staff should note that the hours for lectures and exercises are suggestions only as regards sequence and length of time allocated to each objective. These factors may be adapted by lecturers to suit individual groups of trainees depending on their experience, ability, equipment and staff available for training.

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